Parts Unknown

Zan_Zig_performing_with_rabbit_and_roses,_magician_poster,_1899

Some people believe we are magicians, because we make unwanted things disappear. We wish we had the power to save people from themselves; as it appliesto keeping too much of a bad thing. We would start by prohibiting the practice of saving missing parts.  It pains us to see clients engaging in such an obvious exercise in pure futility. This is what we mean.

You see a glint of something buried in the carpeting.  Your heart races at the thought that at last, you have landed an opportunity to be re-united with the diamond pendant that disappeared a month ago.  Closer inspection reveals the unremarkable truth.  It turns out to be some nut or spring that has become inexplicably stranded from whatever lighting fixture or kitchen gadget from whence it came. In spite of your disappointment, you retrieve the mystery part and place it with an assortment of other orphaned parts in a drawer or box or jar. Then you immediately forget about it.

This stuff falls into the shrapnel category of CRUD because it is nameless, homeless, probably, but yet to be proven, useless. Retrieving thingamajigs is not worth the time. Once you have signed on as a missing parts caretaker, you are further obligated to store them, remember where they are and worry that you are simply sitting on a time bomb. There is a possibility that at any moment your hot water tank could explode due to the strategic absence of the very washer you just picked up off the floor.  If you are unlucky enough to then have your basement flood, you need a plumber and a restoration company. You will also have to file a claim with your insurance company. Too much work.  Minimal reward.

Do you still even have the metal cart, no doubt teetering on three castors? You have the fourth in the palm of your hand.  The rusted heap was probably scrapped years ago.  When you buy a new product, companies think to include along with their instruction manuals , translated into 30 languages, a few spare parts. These newer parts require their own organizing systems for storage and retrieval. This hardly ever happens in our world.  The spare parts enter the home and are either anchored to the packaging, disappear immediately into drawers or bins or are just tossed out as garbage.

CRUD Challenge

Tinkerers, people in the trades, engineers and do-it-yourselfers are automatically exempt from this challenge, as they comprise that small segment of the population that actually uses these parts to fix or create other things. Many of these folks possess an innate ability to recognize the parts and their dubious origins on sight!  The rest of us will have to resign ourselves to a future of relinquishing any parts we may stumble upon to a more responsible member of the family for safekeeping. We want you to be successful in your battle with household CRUD.  You don’t want to waste too much time dealing with insignificant items, when so much more can be achieved by shedding clothes, hobbies and other remnants of past lives that rob you of your time. So, get in there and empty the containers and compartments, brimming with AWOL parts and gently nudge them in the recycling direction.

Advertisements

Good Riddance Professional Organizing Solutions are designed to manage the struggle with clutter people neither have the time nor the patience to handle alone. Good Riddance eliminates the high cost of clinging to unwanted, unorganized and often forgotten clutter. Instead, Good Riddance assists with creating simple, effective organizing solutions that harmonize with your style and budget. Our professionals reduce the anxiety associated with getting organized because you won’t have to face it by yourself. We help you make those tough decisions concerning, what to give away, what to sell and what to throw away. Good Riddance guarantees that what you keep will be stored, organized and accessible.

Posted in Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 893 other followers

Archives
%d bloggers like this: